Review of George Saunders’ CivilWarLand in Bad Decline

This certainly wasn’t one of my best or most articulate vlogs, but I attempt to express what I liked about George Saunders’ CivilWarLand in Bad Decline without giving away the endings to all of the stories contained therein. I also try to encourage watchers and readers alike to go out and pick up a copy of the book. It’s not much of a review, considering I spent most of the video not thinking enough about what I was saying and worrying too much about the flatness of my half-wet hair. But I figured I hadn’t posted one of these in a while, so why not?

A Review of Alison Lurie’s Women and Ghosts

This is a little late getting put up on tumblr because life happened, as well as some technical difficulties. Here I’m reviewing Alison Lurie’scollection of short stories Women and Ghosts. The collection is based around – get ready for your mind to be blown – women and ghosts. However, the title is somewhat deceiving, as all of the stories are more genre-bending then the collection’s title might imply. Pardon the constant hair adjusting and general unorganized nature of the review. Though I love the weather, any sort of heat makes me stupid. That’s my theory anyway.

"I can only make sense of my new life the way I have made sense of everything, since we first met: by describing it to you. That great gift you have always had of listening, asking such excellent questions — when I tell you enough to let you imagine me clearly, then I can imagine myself."

Andrea Barrett, “Servants of the Map”
Day 24  (Book that you wish more people would’ve read) | The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter
Though the stories contained in The Bloody Chamber are fantastic, it is beautiful just to hear them read aloud or to enjoy the words on the page in and of themselves. Content aside for a moment, this book is one of the most well-written pieces of literature I have have consumed. Angela Carter’s writing just leaves you in awe. She has such a profound vocabulary and she applies it in a way that seems so effortless. I would say she is one of the writers I could only over hope to be half as good as. For that reason alone I think her work should be more widely recognized. However, the content itself is also very interesting. Even if you’re not into the actual literary craft and would not find interest in the mechanics of the text, the stories in The Bloody Chamber are unique. 
The Bloody Chamber is a collection of short stories that all revolve around the fairy tale tradition. Original fairy tales such as Bluebeard, Little Red Riding Hood, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, and Beauty and the Beast are all reworked to emphasize aspects of the original fairy tales that were already existing, or at least things that Angela Carter saw in the originals. Most of the stories have dark undertones, some of them being just straight up bizarre. From creepy husbands with strange sexual fetishes to a frail vampire searching for true love to a feral child trying to find her friend in the palace of a ghoulish Lord, this book has a little bit of everything morbid. My favorites in the collection are “The Bloody Chamber,” “The Erl King,” and “Lady in the House of Love.”
This is a really underrated book and sometimes I wish more people had read it so I could discuss it with them. The darkness of these fairy tale adaptations, accompanied by the spectacular writing, make it a real treat to read.

Day 24  (Book that you wish more people would’ve read) | The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter

Though the stories contained in The Bloody Chamber are fantastic, it is beautiful just to hear them read aloud or to enjoy the words on the page in and of themselves. Content aside for a moment, this book is one of the most well-written pieces of literature I have have consumed. Angela Carter’s writing just leaves you in awe. She has such a profound vocabulary and she applies it in a way that seems so effortless. I would say she is one of the writers I could only over hope to be half as good as. For that reason alone I think her work should be more widely recognized. However, the content itself is also very interesting. Even if you’re not into the actual literary craft and would not find interest in the mechanics of the text, the stories in The Bloody Chamber are unique. 

The Bloody Chamber is a collection of short stories that all revolve around the fairy tale tradition. Original fairy tales such as Bluebeard, Little Red Riding Hood, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, and Beauty and the Beast are all reworked to emphasize aspects of the original fairy tales that were already existing, or at least things that Angela Carter saw in the originals. Most of the stories have dark undertones, some of them being just straight up bizarre. From creepy husbands with strange sexual fetishes to a frail vampire searching for true love to a feral child trying to find her friend in the palace of a ghoulish Lord, this book has a little bit of everything morbid. My favorites in the collection are “The Bloody Chamber,” “The Erl King,” and “Lady in the House of Love.”

This is a really underrated book and sometimes I wish more people had read it so I could discuss it with them. The darkness of these fairy tale adaptations, accompanied by the spectacular writing, make it a real treat to read.

"A few of them were written to amuse myself or, more precisely, to get an idea or an image out of my head and pinned safely down on paper; which is as good a reason for writing as I know: releasing demons, letting them fly. Some of the stories began in idleness: fancies and curiosities that got out of hand."

Neil Gaiman, Smoke and Mirrors [on short stories]