Just made a new blog about literature. It’s very bookworm and writer friendly.

Here is the description: Edmund Burke describes the sublime as “whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger… Whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror.” This blog will showcase the literary sublime through passages in various texts. It will also feature definitions of beautiful words and book news.

Currently reading

Currently reading

"A real education takes place, not in the lecture hall or library, but in the rooms of friends, with earnest frolic and happy disputation. Wine can be a wiser teacher than ink, and banter better than books."

Stephen Fry

"Literature is my Utopia. Here I am not disenfranchised. No barrier of the senses shuts me out from the sweet, gracious discourses of my book friends. They talk to me without embarrassment or awkwardness."

Helen Keller 

This article from Bitch Magazine takes a look at some novels from the late 19th century into the early 20th century that represent women living in alternative ways. Some of these books show women who live without the company of men while others take a look at a woman as she struggles to free herself from the strict gender roles of their times. I’ve read some of these selections (and they really are quite good) and intend to read the other ones on this list at some point. I especially recommend Chopin’s work. She was an amazing woman. 

Review of A Natural History of Dragons and Unicorns by Paul and Karin Johnsgard

I had to read this little book for one of my classes and I just thought I’d talk about it a little bit. Quite honestly there isn’t a lot of analysis going on here, because there isn’t that much to analyze. I suppose this isn’t a review so much as an exposure. This book would probably be the most useful to those obsessed with mythical creatures, those that really enjoy high fantasy, and — thought I forgot to mention this in the vlog — those that need some ideas for their latest D&D campaign. Shout out to all my buddies at home, woot! :P Anyway, I suppose my point is that this video is pointless.

Review of George Saunders’ CivilWarLand in Bad Decline

This certainly wasn’t one of my best or most articulate vlogs, but I attempt to express what I liked about George Saunders’ CivilWarLand in Bad Decline without giving away the endings to all of the stories contained therein. I also try to encourage watchers and readers alike to go out and pick up a copy of the book. It’s not much of a review, considering I spent most of the video not thinking enough about what I was saying and worrying too much about the flatness of my half-wet hair. But I figured I hadn’t posted one of these in a while, so why not?

A Review of Alison Lurie’s Women and Ghosts

This is a little late getting put up on tumblr because life happened, as well as some technical difficulties. Here I’m reviewing Alison Lurie’scollection of short stories Women and Ghosts. The collection is based around – get ready for your mind to be blown – women and ghosts. However, the title is somewhat deceiving, as all of the stories are more genre-bending then the collection’s title might imply. Pardon the constant hair adjusting and general unorganized nature of the review. Though I love the weather, any sort of heat makes me stupid. That’s my theory anyway.

A message from lustforthemoonlight


What is one of your favorite quotes?

This is going to sound like such a cop-out answer, but I truly don’t have a list of “favorite quotes” that I can think of off the top of my head. I tend to just pick out what catches my eye at the time. But if I had to pick one that might be among my favorites, here it is: “The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t." - Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

If that one was a bit anti-climactic, here is another one for you: “All I need in life is someone who understands me.” - Miss Lynch, Love in the Time of Cholera